Our aim is to provide young people with the highest quality education, accessible to students of all abilities.


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What you will learn

Contents


•     KS3 (Y7,Y8,Y9)     

•     KS4 (Y10, Y11)   

•     KS5 (Y12, Y13)
 








What you will learn in KS3

The department follows the National Numeracy Strategy Framework for Teaching Mathematics throughout KS3. The content of the framework is divided into units of work based on the following main topic areas:
  • Number
  • Algebra
  • SSM (Shape, Space and Measures)
  • Handling Data (includes Probability)
Topics are revisited and extended throughout years 7, 8 and 9 in order to deepen understanding and build upon previous knowledge.

Year 9 pupils will be entered for GCSE Modular Mathematics 2381, Unit 2. In addition, all pupils sit the internally-marked tests towards the end of both Years 7 and 8 and take half-termly tests throughout the year.

All assessments are marked according to the levels set out by the National Curriculum. The tier of work each student follows is reviewed at key points through the year.

YEAR 7
In year 7 students spend the first half term working through a tailored scheme of work with various APP tasks and questions to complement their learning.
At the end of the first half term all students undertake a formal written assessment which in conjunction with their KS2 result is used to group students into one of four tiers.
Tier
Level
Extension
5-6
Core
4-5
Support
3-5
Access
2-4





YEAR 8
During year 8 students continue to follow a similarly structured programme to that in year 7.
Tier
Level
Extension
6-7
Core
5-6
Support
4-5
Access
3-4
We enter all Year 7 and 8 Extension tier pupils for the Junior Maths Challenge. A good number of pupils gain certificates.




YEAR 9
Year 9 scheme of work is aimed at preparing pupils towards the GCSE exams.
 Tier
 Level
 Extension
 7-8
 Core
 5-7
 Support
 4-6
 Access
 3-5

From September 2012 the Y9 pupils will be following the Linear GCSE Course in Mathematics.           

We participate in the UK Mathematics Challenge. Whilst all students are offered extra-curricular support with their mathematical studies, we would like to develop the range of opportunities available beyond the classroom. All suggestions for clubs are welcome.

 
Key Stage 3 homework:

All pupils are expected to do weekly homework. This alternates between written homework and MyMaths homework each week.

    In Out
Year 7 ab Wednesday Monday
  cd Monday Thusday
       
Year 8 ab Monday Thursday
  cd Thusday Monday
       
Year 9   Thursday Monday
The homework tasks include investigational activities and ICT based worksheets.
 
There are level descriptors which describe what a student can do at each key stage and also within that stage.

Level Descriptors
The following should give pupils and parents an idea of what pupils are required to be able to do or understand to achieve the various National Curriculum levels throughout Key Stage 3.
Some topics have links to BBC Bitesize,Mymaths or Subtangent to help you with revision. To access the Learnpremium links, you will need the school user name and password. Pupils can obtain this information from staff in school.

Level 4
Number and Algebra
-         Describe number patterns
-         Find multiples
-         Find factors
-         Work out the square numbers
-         Use word formulae
-         Use co-ordinates in the first quadrant
-         Multiply and divide whole numbers by 10 and 100
-         Say my tables up to 10x10
-         Add and subtract numbers like 13.64 and 48.95
-         Write decimal numbers in the correct order
-         Check my own answers
Shape, Space and Measures
-         Make 3D models
-         Draw 2D shapes
-         Find perimeters of shapes
-         Find the area by counting squares
Handling Data
-         Draw line graphs
-         Present data clearly
-         Read simple pie charts
-         Draw frequency tables
-         Find the mode
-         Find the range

Level 5
Number and Algebra
-         Multiply and divide whole numbers by 10, 100 and 1000
-         Add and subtract negative numbers
-         Put numbers in order including negative numbers
-         Add, subtract, multiply and divide numbers like 19.75 and 34.21
-         Simplify a fraction
-         Work out a fraction or percentage of a number
-         Multiply or divide a three digit number by a two digit number
-         Use inverse operations of approximation to check my answers
-         Use simple formulae like C = 2n + 4
-         Use co-ordinates in all four quadrants
Shape, Space and Measures
-         Measure and draw angles to the nearest degree
-         Remember the metric to imperial conversions
-         Use and understand the formula for the area of a rectangle
Handling Data
-         Find the mean of discrete data
-         Use the range and one of the averages to compare two sets of data
-         Say what diagrams and graphs show
-         Use the probability scale from 0 to 1
-         Understand that experiments don’t always have the same outcome

Level 6
Number and Algebra
-         Use trial and improvement to solve things like x3 + 5x = 38
-         Work out one number as a fraction or percentage of another
-         Understand that fractions, decimals and percentages can be equivalent to each other (e.g. 0.5=50%)
-         Calculate using ratio
-         Add and subtract fractions with common denominators
-         Find and describe in words the rule for the next term in a sequence (linear)
-         Find and describe in words the rule for the nth term in a sequence
-         Solve linear equations with integer coefficients
-         Plot the graph of y = mx + c
Shape, Space and Measures
-         Recognise 2D representations of 3D objects
-         Classify quadrilaterals by knowing their properties
-         Find the missing angles when two parallel lines are intersected
-         Solve angle problems in polygons
-         Write instructions to make a computer draw a shape
-         Find the area and circumference of a circle
-         Find the volume of cuboids
-         Enlarge a shape by a positive scale factor
Handling Data
-         Work with continuous data
-         Construct pie charts
-         Say what a scatter diagram tells us
-         Understand correlation
-         Find all the possible outcomes of two experiments
-         Use the fact that the probability of mutually exclusive events add up to 1

Level 7
Number and Algebra
-         Round to one significant figure
-         Understand what happens when we multiply or divide by numbers between 0 and 1
-         Multiply and divide numbers of any size
-         Understand proportional change
-         Describe in symbols the rule for the next term or nth term in a sequence (quadratic)
-         Multiply things like (a + b)(c + d)
-         Simplify quadratic expressions
-         Solve simultaneous, linear equations with two variables (using graphs or algebra)
-         Solve inequalities like 6(2n + 1)=18
Shape, Space and Measures
-         Understand and use Pythagoras’ Theorem in 2D
-         Calculate lengths, areas and volumes in right prisms
-         Enlarge a shape by a fractional scale factor
-         Understand similarity
-         Draw the locus of a moving object
-         Find and understand upper and lower bounds
-         Use compound measures like speed, distance, time
Handling Data
-         Give and test a hypothesis to a situation
-         Understand bias
-         Find the modal class and an estimate to the mean, median and range when using grouped data
-         Compare distributions using frequency polygons
-         Draw a line of best fit on a scatter diagram
-         Understand relative frequency

Level 8
Number and Algebra
-         Solve problems involving powers and roots
-         Solve problems involving standard form
-         Solve problems involving repeated proportional change
-         Substitute fractions and decimals into equations and expressions and find the answers
-         Calculate one variable in a formula when I know the others
-         Understand that a2 - b2 = (a + b)(a - b)
-         Solve inequalities in two variables
-         Sketch and interpret graphs of quadratic, cubic and reciprocal functions
-         Interpret graphs that model real life situations
Shape, Space and Measures
-         Use congruence and mathematical similarity
-         Use sine, cosine and tangent in right angled triangles in 2D
-         Distinguish between formulae for perimeter, area and volume by considering dimensions
Handling Data
-         Interpret and construct cumulative frequency diagrams
-         Estimate the median and inter-quartile range
-         Calculate the probability of a compound event
 
Assessment:
  • In the Maths department staffs are encouraged to use green pens to mark pupils work.
  • Pupils use Fact (F), Understanding (U), Skill (S), and Explain (E) as a means of self assessment. They use traffic lights to grade their F.U.S.E scores.
  • Teachers use traffic lights to keep records of pupils’ homework assignments in their mark books.
  • Pupils self assessment is encouraged in all lessons to enhance understanding and learning.
  • Peer assessment is encouraged and opportunities are provided in selected during lessons, when pupils give verbal and non verbal responses.
  • End of every half term there are test for all year groups.
  • All years have an end of year examinations.

 

What you will learn in KS4:

What type of course do students follow?

The Mathematics Department at Loxford School of Science and Technology follow a Modular GCSE Course. From September 2012 most of the Y9 pupils will be following the Linear course in GCSE Mathematics and the Y10 and Y11 pupils will continue with the Modular GCSE course.
 
This Modular course comprises of three units:
•         Unit 1 (30% of total grade), which focuses on statistics and probability content
•         Unit 2 (30% of total grade), which focuses on number, algebra and geometry
•         Unit 3 (40% of total grade), which focuses on number, algebra and geometry and builds on the content of Unit 2.
This means there are three short exams which students take and the results of each exam are added together to give an overall grade.

Which examination board do you follow?

The Edexcel Examination Board. Further information is available from www.edexcel.org.uk

When are the exams for the Modular course, and what percentage do they count for?

 Module 

Description

Structure

 Weighting 

Unit 1

Handling Data

One Calculator Paper
(1 hour 15 minutes)

30%

Unit 2

 Basic Mathematics on Number  & Algebra; Shape,
Space and Measure

One Non-Calculator Paper
(1 hour 15 minutes)

30%

Unit 3

Advanced Mathematics on Number & Algebra; Shape, Space and Measure

One Calculator Paper
(Higher: 1 hour 45 minutes)
(Foundation: 1 hour 30 minutes)

40%


A percentage of each examination paper will access the functional elements of Mathematics.


How do you group pupils?

There are now only 2 tiers in Mathematics. The old intermediate tier no longer exists.

Foundation tier: Grades C to G
Higher tier: Grades A* to C

The Mathematics Department broadly groups students into 4 tiers to ensure pupils are taught at an appropriate level. At examination time pupils will only sit the Higher or Foundation paper:
Textbook Grades
Higher + Tier A*- A
Higher Tier B – C
Foundation + Tier C – D
Foundation Tier E - G


 

Do you still have coursework / controlled assessment?

No coursework / controlled assessment in Mathematics.

What textbooks do you use in class?

Each student in class has an Oxford University Press GCSE textbook.

When are pupils given homework?

Each pupil will receive one major homework piece per week from their class teacher. The homework will often be set from the Oxford University Press homework book which compliments the class textbook and has been given to pupils to keep at home during term time.

Do you provide practise exam papers?

Yes. All students have access to at least 5 years worth of actual exam papers.

Do you offer only 1 GCSE in Mathematics?

No. Pupils in the Higher + tier will also be entered for GCSE Statistics. They are provided with a course textbook and practise papers also.

What internet sites do you recommend?

The Mathematics department has bought into an online study support package at www.mymaths.co.uk

This website has online lessons, Maths games, worksheets and homework sheets. Pupils have already been given individual passwords and their class teachers can set online homeworks and monitor their progress.

What grade is my child working at?

Every term you will receive three Maths report / tracking cards detailing the current grade and potential grade of your child. If you still are unclear you may contact the Mathematics teacher of your child.

What is the difference between levels and grades?

From primary school up until year 9 students are often assessed according to levels (1-8). At GCSE grades are only used.
Assessment:
• In the Maths department staffs are encouraged to use green pens to mark pupils work.
• Pupils use Fact (F), Understanding (U), Skill (S), and Explain (E) as a means of self assessment. They use traffic lights to grade their F.U.S.E scores.
• Teachers use traffic lights to keep records of pupils’ homework assignments in their mark books.
• Pupils self assessment is encouraged in all lessons to enhance understanding and learning.
• Peer assessment is encouraged and opportunities are provided in selected during lessons, when pupils give verbal and non verbal responses.
• End of every half term there are test for all year groups.
• All years have an end of year examinations.

 

What you will learn in KS5:

Exam Board: EDEXCEL
Why choose Mathematics at Loxford?

Having successfully completed your GCSE course in Mathematics at grade A or A* (grade B students may be considered on the recommendation of their Maths teacher) you are now in a position to tackle Maths at a more advanced level. This is a highly regarded and enjoyable A level. Even students, who may not have enjoyed GCSE Maths, find A level Maths a much more stimulating and rewarding course.
 
Here at Loxford we are very proud ofour maths students’ outstanding record of achievement over many years. We can guarantee that every student will receive first class tuition using a variety of teaching strategies. This coupled with our excellent support programme makes Loxford, in our opinion, the only place to study Maths.
Where does this course lead?
Maths can lead to a myriad of courses in both further and higher education. Obvious careers may include accountancy, banking, engineering, medicine, computing and scientific statistical research. However, there are many other diverse areas where mathematical skills are recognised as invaluable and essential.
What will I study?
The Maths course has a modular structure with three modules leading to an AS level in the first year and six modules to an A level. The core of the subject is the Pure Maths modules (Core 1, 2, 3 and 4). The first module extends certain topics you have studied at GCSE (number, algebra, graphs and trigonometry) and introduces new ones (e.g. calculus) so that you have the basic tools needed to study maths at a
more advanced level in Core 2, 3 and 4. In addition students will study some Applied Maths modules. These modules are concerned with how Maths can solve real-life problems. In each year pupils study one applied Maths module.
How is the course examined?
At AS level, you will take Core 1 Core 2 and either Decision 1 or Statistics 1, usually examined in May/June.
At A2 level, you will take Core 3 in January followed by Core 4 and an applied module from Statistics 1 or 2, Mechanics1 or 2, and Decision Maths 1 or 2. Each module is of equal weight and is examined by a one and a half hour paper.
 
 There is no coursework for any of these modules.
What is Fast-track Maths?
If you are likely to achieve a grade A* (and possibly grade A) in your GCSE Maths and enjoy Maths you should seriously consider studying A level Maths in one year- this is called Fast-track Maths. This is a highly regarded course and attracts not only students who wish to study Maths or a related subject at university but also those students who want to show that they are very able and can complete an A level in one year.
What will I study?
The Further Maths course has a
modular structure with three modules
leading to an AS level and six modules
to an A level. The Further Pure modules
extend the work covered in Core 1,
2, 3 and 4. In addition to these
modules, students will take a variety
of applied modules including Decision
Maths, Mechanics or Statistics.
Many students who follow the full A
level course opt to study 7 rather
than 6 modules to enhance their
understanding of the subject and to
give themselves a better chance of a
top grade. For those who study just
the 6 modules there is an element of
choice in which modules to take.
Why choose Further Maths?
 
If you are likely to achieve a grade A* in your GCSE Maths, and a grade A in GCSE Statistics, and you enjoy Maths you should seriously consider studying A level Further Maths.
 
The course attracts very able mathematicians who thoroughly enjoy the subject and are keen to extend their understanding of Maths. Many students taking this course go off to university to study Maths or a Mathematics related degree and have found the work covered on the course of great benefit.